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Why Don't You Change?

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I’ve been interested in J. Krishnamurti for a really long time.

Today I was telling his story to a friend of mine– we were talking about demagogues and people who follow authority– and I told him that I had come across a great video of his on Youtube.

Here is that video. Very interesting. Take a look.

* Filed by Julien at 4:47 pm under random


Hi, I’m Julien Smith. I'm the founder and CEO of Breather.

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5 Responses to “Why Don't You Change?”

  1. Jean Says:

    He keeps shifting in his chair. It’s almost distracting, but hie really hammers the point home.
    Good video, Julien.

  2. Rob McDougall Says:

    I closed my eyes. Especially when they cut away. Massively important points.

    Why don’t I change? Change into what? I would like to affect change. I feel it more every day – but how does one start on the path? Any more recommendations of clips / books etc. from J. Krishnamurti would be most appreciated.

    Of course, reading that back – I realise this always happens. Someone comes along, spreads a proliphic message, a new way of seeing the world, and everyone asks them “how?” – as if they have the answer. I once saw Adam Curtis get beaten down by an audience who expected him to, prophet like, have all the answers to the problems established in his films… I suppose we all want change. And no-one knows how to start…

  3. Whitney Says:

    Great video- and it comes down to status quo seems more comfortable than taking the risk of failure, of trying new thins, of making a difference big and small. The well worn path seems safe, even if it’s just go with the flow, leaving the risks to others. Of course, life is more interesting and rewarding when we choose change, but the risk seems like too much for many, so safety in numbers prevails.

  4. Rufus Shepherd Says:

    If I radically change, others would seek to abandon or destroy me, depending on how my change affects them. Mostly, though, since we can only deeply affect a few around us, that radical change would be ignored and in vain.

  5. larry Says:

    The natural man is incapable of change, without intervention from the spiritual man. The spiritual man cannot intervene unless he is converted. Not the evangelical or self serving conversion which comes from inner reflection or meditation, but real spiritual rebirth. Change then becomes possible, but only remains through constant growth, or it naturally withers, and reverts to a 2nd death.

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