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The Quick, 12-Step Guide to Quitting That @#$%ing Job You Hate

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Guess what, it’s Monday! And you’re still at that job you hate. Nice.

1. 9am. Get to the office. Go straight to the coffee machine. Hang out there for 10 minutes before heading to your desk. Dread the workweek.

2. 9:10am. Check Facebook and email, despite having just done so on your iPhone 15 minutes prior. Delay the inevitable start of an empty, energy-draining day which will leave you uninterested in social interaction, learning, and sex.

3. 10am. Look around at your co-workers. Realize that they are all either a) mindless drones, b) shriveled, pathetic versions of their former, bright selves, or c) social-climbing douchebag sociopaths. Question the purpose of your existence as you stare at your reflection in your computer monitor circa 1995.

4. 10:05am. Realize how much longer you’ve been at this job than what you intended, awakening in you a horrible, hateful anger which had until now remained dormant like a sleeping dragon for longer than you thought was possible.

5. 10:10am. Begin shaking in rage. Pop a blood vessel in your eyeball. Briefly choke the telephone as if it were some unknown person’s neck before regaining your composure.

6. 10:30am. Analyze options. Consider that, perhaps, you could ask for a transfer to another department or another city. With horror, become conscious that everytime you’ve spoken to them on the phone, they seemed even more brain-dead than the mouth-breathing sycophants in Human Resources.

7. 10:45am. Think back to the time you were offered the cool job with the startup downtown. Have dark thoughts about the we-need-you guilt-tripping that was done to prevent you from quitting. Attempt and fail to slit your wrists with a stapler. Finally acknowledge that you will have to either quit, or throw yourself off the roof, this week. It’s a toss-up.

8. 11am. Awaken to the reality that you may still have much to live for. Recall that time you wanted to work on that documentary or be in that punk band. Realize the guitar is still in the basement, and that no one has yet tried out the website idea you had that your girlfriend was excited about.

9. 11:10am. Start a list of the worst things that could happen if you quit right now. Finally acknowledge the possibility that it wouldn’t actually be that bad, despite how anxious you are about it. Picture yourself on your deathbed.

10. 11:20am. Ask yourself if you can live without your daily soy non-fat latté, your gourmet BLT with aioli mayo, or your 100% pure fruit 2pm snack bar. Ask yourself if starving for a few months is better or worse than being here and simply starving on the inside.

11. 11:30am. Realize that, fuck it, you’re better than that. Walk into your boss’ office and quit with dignity.

12. Noon. Emerge from boss’ office, possibly glowing. Go to lunch. Begin your new life.

* Filed by Julien at 6:54 am under guide, humour, parody, rant


Hi, I’m Julien Smith. I'm the founder and CEO of Breather.

Check out more of my blog, my free book or add me on twitter. Also, we're hiring. Check that out.

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80 Responses to “The Quick, 12-Step Guide to Quitting That @#$%ing Job You Hate”

  1. Diss Web Design Says:

    Julien,

    Written in a manner that only you can. The point being the only thing stopping you from quitting the job you hate is you.

    Too true.

    Sean

  2. Jana Says:

    I would have felt way better about this post if I wasn’t reading it at work at 8:55am and delaying starting today’s mundane and soul destroying work.

    Right now the only thing keeping me from quitting is knowing that having a (continuous) job will make sponsoring my partner for immigration that much easier.

  3. Mitch Joel - Twist Image Says:

    There are so many funny and smart parts of this Blog post, I don’t know where to begin.

    A long ways back, I was thinking about going into my second or third entrepreneurial venture. At that time, I had become institutionalized. I was used to working for someone else and relying on them for my outcome. I then heard Seth Godin say something that stuck with me to this very day. “The safest thing you can do is to be risky and the riskiest thing you can do is be safe.”

    It’s the perfect aphorism for this post and what many people are going through.

  4. Scott Webb Says:

    I quit the job I hated around January 18th 2010.

    I’ve done probably every single thing “Wrong” and I’m still around to write this comment. It was the 11:10am thinking that I had playing in my head over and over and over again. The sad thing was that it was probably 11:10PM taking phone calls from angry banking customers. I was actually on my deathbed already or so it felt.

    This timeline actually mirrors the day I quit. I had a day shift for the first time in a long time and I tweeted to ask for a resignation letter because I didn’t even want to spend time writing my own.

    I was out around the time of Lunch!

  5. Julien Says:

    Scott, I did the same thing over and over again– always, seemingly at 7 months until my last job (at a call centre), which I kept for 2.5 years.

    I can write this post pretty easily because I’ve done it so many times… I remember that feeling really well.

  6. Donna Papacosta Says:

    Julien, I left a soul-sucking job 25 years ago and have not regretted it once.

  7. Jess Ostroff Says:

    I’ve only made it to the 10:05am stage before I got off my ass and quit. Scary, obviously, but also amazing. I can’t use enough cliches to describe all the things that happened after that, so I won’t. But thanks for this reminder of how awesome working for yourself is.

    Also, I hope some miserable people read this and quit today. You should check on those stats at the end of the week ;)

  8. Amy Says:

    So close to the truth it’s scary.

  9. Linda Says:

    Ok OK! The universe sent me here so obviously is telling me that I’m supposed *act* on my thoughts of quitting so that I can focus on what I really want to do. Thanks for the cosmic reassurance! ((I think we should start a support group though. I can tell I will need some hand-holding.))

  10. Dean Holmes Says:

    Great stuff. Luckily I work for myself. Question is when I have a shitty day how to fire myself.

  11. Julien Says:

    @Linda — We provide tough love, not hand-holding. Walk through the valley and fear no evil.

    • Luis Says:

      @ Julian. I’m writing a bit too late after this blog was published. What you’ve written is very accurate. I changed jobs (and almost cities now) for a job a I hate. And I’ve only been there 4 months! Thought it was an opportunity but it’s far from it. Problem: I’m 46, I have a family (although my wife is employed). The fear is that my career could end if I quit this job and won’t find another one, esp in this economic circumstances. It’s not easy.
      Many thanks Julian. It’s a fantastic blog.

  12. Bettina Asher Says:

    This is my first day back at work after a two-week stress leave. I took leave because I was going to quit my soul-sucking joke of a job, and someone talked me into taking a break instead. After being here four hours, I’m pretty sure I’m still going to quit and work retail over Christmas.

    The first thing on my task list, left for me by a boss who is away on business, is to convert a pdf into a workable document. This is the same boss who asked me for the keyboard shortcut for “delete”, constantly asks if I’m pregnant, and calls me on the weekend.

    Your account of heading for coffee, checking Facebook, categorizing coworkers, choking the phone, and threatening to jump off the roof are all eerily accurate.

    I think it’s time for me to quit. Thanks for helping me decide.

  13. Jodi Henderson Says:

    I went on vacation to France earlier this month and have been in a pretty deep depression since I returned. (If I had the money, I would not have come back from France.) It’s a combination of hating my job and frustration with myself for not being in a position to just quit. After reading this post, however, I did apply for a new job because that’s the best I can do right now.

    I’m still working toward creating multiple income streams, but those will take a while to grow. The ultimate goal is to become nomadic (for a while, at least) using these income streams to support me.

    I’m working on it.

  14. Sherman Rockwell Says:

    Oh, damn, that brought back such gut-wrenching memories!! I still graphically remember that day for me. My brain was twisted around my intestines when I finally and resolutely made my decision. I got up, floated into her office and practically shouted, “Hug me! I’m leaving!”

  15. Julien Says:

    My personal favourite is the longing look they give you sometimes, like they want to do it themselves but don’t have the balls.

  16. Kneale Mann Says:

    The reason we are laughing AND crying is because we have all been that guy. Welcome to the world of the unemployable.

  17. Beth Campbell Duke Says:

    Love it! I was actually at the doctor’s collapsed in a heap when he was reading questions from the “how depressed are you” sheet. When he asked if I’d ever harm myself, I asked him if he was insane. “What’s the worst you would do?” the equally-stressed out doctor asked me? “I’d phone my employer and tell them to stick their F-ing job”, says I. “I guess we’ve solved your problem then”, says he.

    Now I do personal branding so that other people don’t have to get quite so far down that particular road!

    God bless those of us who are unfit for “real jobs”.

  18. John McLachlan Says:

    I’ve left three jobs I liked. 1982, 2001, 2004. I’ve never had a job (my definition is being an employee, not self-employed) I “hated.”

    Still, I suspect this is good advice for many who do have jobs they hate. Go for it, get out. “I got one life to live and that’s all I can give, so don’t beat me down.” (Gordon Lightfoot)

  19. Julien Says:

    John, you’re lucky dude. I’ve left many.

    Our generation (sorry!) is different. We have Masters degrees but we work in coffee shops. We have to deal with a lot of jobs we hate, and we have to stay in them longer and get less pay.

    Seriously, it’s a big difference I think.

    Oh, and who’s Gordon Lightfoot? ;)

  20. harriet fancott Says:

    Ridiculous how difficult that is. I did it recently and it took me YEARS of agonizing waffling and self-doubt culminating in (i am not kidding) months of yakkity yak and bouts of crying. The self-doubt is till there but at least I did it!

  21. Donna L Says:

    Keep it up ! Loved it !

  22. Ken Hubscher Says:

    It seriously has to be considered that one of the greatest horrors a person can experience may well just be completing a life and regretting all the things they DIDN’T do rather than all the things they did. On that note, a full marching band salute to all who are brave enough to venture out into the world of uncertainty and Canadian EI :-) Carpe Diem folks….live the life you want to live and make sure you love the person looking back at you in the mirror. That person usually makes the best life coach… Well written Julien!

  23. Robin Gerhart Says:

    I did that very thing this year, no looking back and no regrets!

  24. Sandy Says:

    Wow, it’s like you were inside my head.
    You’re right, the only person stopping me is…me.

  25. Don Power - Managing Editor Sprout Social Insights Blog Says:

    Been there.

    Done that.

    And I’m SO much better for it.

    Cheers J!

    - Don

  26. Frances Schagen Says:

    It would be interesting to find the statistics about the number of people who quit today.

    I vowed 15 years ago never to work for anyone else again. And I haven’t.

  27. Zach Cole Says:

    Without question the most entertaining post I’ve read all week (maybe month?). Very nice.

  28. HAAF Says:

    I have done this exact thing, although Maybe with less steps. One day I just walked in to work, realized I hated it and quit on the spot. Probably the best decision I ever made and definitely the most satisfying.

  29. James Says:

    Everyone at my blog selloutyoursoul.com should read this…you are the resistance in your own life…this blog just always delivers

  30. Saki Says:

    Great advice, but what to do when unemployment is high and one can’t choose?

  31. IamDavid Says:

    I have been unemployed for two years. There are so many ways to make a living besides a job, if I can do it, anyone can do it. Besides, I’m pretty sure when I’m on my death bed I won’t be wishing I spent more time in the office!

  32. Steve Says:

    I walked out on the job I hated on October 15. I walked into a new opportunity on October 18. Who said intestinal fortitude isn’t your friend?

  33. Bergermeister Says:

    “If you find a job you love, you’ll never have to work a day in your life.” That’s a great saying and congrats to those of you strong and bold enough to do it.
    I’d also like to give a congrats to those who hate their jobs but hang in there due to obligations to their family or themselves. Their determination to survive and provide as they’re framing a house in the dead of winter or emptying a bedpan shows their commitment to someone other than themselves.
    I personally believe a person can be content and even happy as long as they are content upstairs, it’s just easier if you’re fortunate enough to love your job.

  34. Darren Says:

    I quit four years ago. It’s been a rocky road, taking some awful home based jobs until my business got on its feet, but it wouldn’t have happened had i continued to hang around the suckups with their nice cars and empty lives, that all thought i was insane and destined to fail.
    Now I work when, where and for whomever I want. Blogs like this are a real help to people trying to wean themselves off a job they hate.

  35. Carmela Says:

    Great piece…reading my mind so thoroughly. It almost makes me want to go and do it, at lunch (a couple hours from now). I’ve been trying to get out of here since I got here…and thanks to the sucky economy and too many unemployed people, it hasn’t happened. This energizes me…

  36. clarissa Says:

    It’s 821am and I am reading this at work. hmmm.

  37. Lotta Says:

    Thanks Julien – this post kind of changed my life.

    Keep writing.
    Lotta

  38. Lotta Says:

    Oh, and you know I only came across your blog because my finger slipped when typing the URL for my online bank? Talk about cashing in a better way eh?

    Speading the word in London!

  39. Stirling Says:

    I work in internet marketing so its not that bad and I can be creative, but I want to be on my own, and I know I will be there soon. Keep up the Great work Julien

    -Stirling

  40. Joseph Ratliff Says:

    Julien, how did you know how my last day working for someone worked out?

    I just wish I would have done it sooner.

    Back to life. :)

  41. Lele Grant Says:

    I promised myself that I would never hate a job for more than six months. I left into a cycle of putting things off and one day I looked at my journal and said enough. I went in and resigned. I felt light.

    Now I feel that I’m back on track.

  42. Gypsi Says:

    Today was my last day. I resigned after working at the same job for almost 5 years. I was going nowhere and I was unhappy. Reading this post just helped confirm that I made the right choice. I have no idea what’s next, but I finally feel that I have more life to live and that there are endless opportunities for growth.

  43. Lucius Says:

    There is no substitute for leaving a job you hate!!! The job it self I didnt mind so much, but the people I had to work with ……. Aberdeen scotland has a lot of people who in any other city would be mistaken for homeless/long term drug addicts and indeed i thought they were… until i got a job in a clothes store and found the same people working there!!! The average intelect on a good day was only just functionally retarded, for instance The store manager has only been in her position for circa 7 months (at time of writing) but working in the stores for 13 years!!!! The assistant manager thought she could talk down to down for no reason and said “there’s the door if you don’t like it”. She probably thought I was like her can couldnt do better in life and that I wouldnt use it!! I gave her the key back the next day (unfortunatly i had forgot to bring it that day) Crazy woman ….. Lucius Aberdeen Scotland

  44. Maria Says:

    Thank you for this!

    I am currently sitting in that very old about to break desk staring at my laptop (they don’t provide a circa 1995 monitor at work), thinking why I am not brave enough to quit.

    You pretty much gave me a great boost. I just want to quit already!!! I don’t know why I am drowning in a glass of water.

    Anyways, Thanks!

  45. Josh Sarz Says:

    I did this a couple of months ago. I’ve never been happier in my life, aside from when my parents bought me a Playstation when I was a kid.

  46. Will Says:

    I just ended a 9 month IT contract that I could’ve extended. Work at home, make insane coin but still not happy. It happens everywhere I work. So now I’m learning mobile app dev on my own and having lots of fun. Of course there’s no cash coming in but I had paid off my house/car and have pretty good savings.

  47. Marnie Hughes Says:

    I’ve done this myself and felt enormously liberated. But I have a friend who feels trapped because he supports a family of 5. Not so easy to leap with that kind of responsibility.

    • J Says:

      And there’s the problem. Wife, kids, only my income keeping us. That’s a lot of responsibility – not responsibility that I begrudge at all – but it makes the leap that much more difficult to justify.

      • Ludovic Urbain Says:

        More difficult to make, but you can do it.

        Think about this: you can always save 5%, right ?
        Do that for 20 months and you have one month of pure unlimited freedom to do ANYTHING and completely change jobs if you need to.

        I know the responsibility is a tough one, I’m separated from my daughter’s mother and there’s no way I can go abroad if I can’t afford at least two plane tickets per month to either come back here or invite her(my daughter of course) over.

        I’m not there yet but I’m moving towards it, and I’m 100% sure it’s possible.

        Any excuse is a bad excuse, all problems were created to be solved and if you need a solution, there are literally thousands of people who will share their ideas for free.

  48. Micah Stubblefield Says:

    I’ve quit several jobs but I make the mistake of finding a new job before quitting. I was just thinking today of all the positive things about my job. I’m remote from the rest of my team and free to work from home if I choose (4 kids at so I tend to like the quiet time at work).

    What really gets me is when I look at my co-workers and categorize them exactly as you described!!! I then ask myself what category I fall under and I lie to myself and say that I am none. I am playing the game.

    Happiness is a choice. More than quitting a job one needs to choose to be happy. Get really good at being your best and if your job gets in the way of that you’ll likely do just fine without it.

  49. Aaron Says:

    All of this sounds great Julien, except for those who have kids, and an awesome personal choice like that could potentially bring hardship to those children. Who should you think of first, yourself, or your kids? On the flip-side, what are we teaching our kids to do by accepting that shitty job, even if intent is for their benefit. Very curious on your thoughts buddy.

    • Randy Says:

      First, you said “potentially”. The real truth is you can’t KNOW until you actually do quit.

      Second, children are tougher than we give them credit for and need a lot less than we think they do. Basic clothes, food and shelter combined with love, attention, and time together are all they NEED. Everything else is a want, including Xboxes, cell phones, piano lessons.

      Your kids just need you. Not stuff. I think you’d be surprised at just how little it takes to support them financially, when you’re present emotionally, mentally, and physically.

      Good luck!

    • Ludovic Urbain Says:

      I left a post above that covers that in more detail but basically every problem has a solution.

      And don’t think you’re helping your children by showing them that the only way is to be a slave worker with a loan – unless that’s exactly what you want.

  50. Michael Campbell Says:

    I quit my horrible job on 01/13/12. I have a wife and kids. And yes, my teenage daughter was mad at me in the beginning because she was only thinking about herself not getting a car. My wife was mad in the beginning as well, but realized after her own research into my so called job that she now understands and realizes what I had to put up with on a daily basis with this employer.

    I’m not worried about finding another job. Everthing will work out they way it’s suppose too. I can finally work on the things that matter to me. My wife even stated she didn’t want me to get another mindless, horrible job. She wants me to be happy doing work I will love.

  51. Tony Says:

    This post is dangerous! I’m reading this at my desk and it’s 9:15am. I’ll let you know if I make it through the day. I think I’m nearing the stapler stage as I get closer to my first “Monday Morning Meeting.”

  52. Adam Dukes Says:

    So many people work at jobs they hate, it’s really sad. I was laid off in ’09, but started following a passion/hobby and turned it into a business. It hasn’t been an easy road, but I’ve learned a lot.

  53. Valentina Inbloom Says:

    everything does always work out. Thanks for the boost to make this horrible situation i am in, go away! I too will quit! Congrats to those that QUIT already!!!!

  54. Angela Says:

    Who are these people that quit a job one day and the next are still making money doing other things? I know if I quit my job, I’d be screwed! I might be able to bring in like $50 a month tops.. It is not so easy to just find a new job these days… and it’s kinda silly to think that everyone can make a living wage working for themselves from day one.

    • Randy Says:

      It is exactly that kind of thinking that will keep you trapped where you are.

      Remember, it doesn’t necessarily have to be an all or done thing. You can build a new business on the side and gradually transition from your day job to your new business. The real question is how badly do you want it? Are you willing to sacrifice time, maybe even sleep, or a few daily luxuries? Are you willing to WORK for it?

  55. Michelle Says:

    I’ve been planning to quit my job for two, yes, two years! In that time, I’ve cut down on my spending and saved a ton of money…enough to keep me in good shape if it took me 18 months to find a job. So why haven’t I quit already? Fear. I once heard someone say that FEAR stands for “False Evidence Appearing Real”. What am I fearful of? What people would think if I quit a job with a prestigious company and a six-figure salary to find something that makes me happy. Fear that it’ll take me years to find a job and I’ll end up destitute and living under a bridge. I’ve been a corporate stooge for most of my adult life and, while I’m at the point of hating it, I’m still having issues with forcefully removing myself from an environment that drains my soul. Sounds crazy, right? Fear can do that to you!

    I love what Maria said, “I don’t know why I am drowning in a glass of water”. I feel like I’m unnecessarily abusing myself, particularly on nights like this when I’m up at 1:30am unable to sleep and stressed about going into the office the next day. Arrgggh! I’ve read this blog before and had to come back for inspiration. Life is too short and I’m fortunate that I have money saved and no mouths to feed other than my own. I can identify so much with everything in this blog and just need to squash the irrational fear and get to points #11 and #12 already. Thanks again for the inspiration….it’s time for me to begin my new life :)

    • Randy Says:

      Michelle, it sounds to me like you have all the right stuff to succeed in a brand new life. Just from the description of your situation, you don’t strike me as the kind of person who will end up destitute living under a bridge.

      You’ve proven you can get and hold a high-level career. You’ve proven you have tenacity and discipline to save 18 months of money. If you downsized your life (e.g. minimalism, etc) I bet you could stretch that to 2-3 years! That’s simply amazing. How many other people could pull that off?

      Remember, there is no “right way” to live ones life. Just your way. To hell with what anyone else thinks–the truth is they are probably envious that you are willing to do what they don’t have the guts to.

      Best of luck–go for it!

    • Ludovic Urbain Says:

      I’ve been like you in a position where I just couldn’t do what I knew I needed to.

      And I went to see a shrink.

      And it helped me understand myself better.
      Since then, +1 girlfriend, self-employed, quit smoking, sports, sleep early, own projects.

      Sometimes we have something blocking us that we can’t understand, that’s often the best time to ask someone for help ;)

      • Michelle Says:

        First of all, thank you so much for your encouraging comments. So I did it! I quit my job in May! Since then I’ve traveled to Europe for a few weeks, started working out and eating right, lost 20lbs, and am overall much more engaged in life and doing things I enjoy! I didn’t realize just how much I hated the environment I was in until I didn’t have to deal with it any more.

        I totally agree with Ludovic about needing to understand myself better. In late April, I started working with a life coach who really helped me see how I was allowing limiting beliefs to block my progress. I also better understood that the job I was in (and some previous jobs) left me so unfulfilled because they required me to be (or act like) someone that I wasn’t. They didn’t focus on my natural skills, abilities and passions and forced me to play act my way through each day…after a while that gets exhausting!

        Anyway, I’m happier now than I’ve been in a long time and am really focused on being true to myself and not getting into a “round hole, square peg” situation again. I’m taking my time to figure out what’s next and being very mindful about what I want in life. I feel very blessed and excited about what’s to come!

  56. Josh Says:

    A very wise person has said “Wherever you go, there you are.” Before blowing off a job, shouldn’t we also consider whether we would be just as bored and dis-satisfied with life if our career situation were different? I’ve worked for myself for almost 10 years now, and I still get the soul-crushing feelings, the overwhelming boredom, the despair. But I’ve realized so much of that is about the attitude I bring to each day, not the circumstances. Even when we get to choose exactly what we want to do, there are still days when we don’t want to do that either. Wherever I go and whatever I do, I just can’t seem to get away from ME, damn it!

  57. Alisha Says:

    I just recently stumbled on your blog. I came to it by typing, “I need a fucking change,” while at “work.” I’ve read through most of these comments, and I’ve read quite a few of your blog posts, but this post got me. Not only does this post apply to my job, but it applies to my marriage, my whole life.

    I am betraying myself.

    Currently, I am the receptionist at a rental company, which caters to the oil field. For one, the job is boring and so degrading. I’m not someone’s bitch,I am a poet with a BA in English! For two, I don’t agree with oil field politics, at all. Williston, North Dakota is a nightmare. Never ever come here! The drilling scene is obscene and is in the red on my ethics-meter.

    No matter how hard I try to rationalize staying here in ND, in a sham marriage, at a job I hate–(the job pays very well and I might find myself facing divorce, my husband wants “us” to remain in ND until the boom is over and I’m trying to salvage my marriage, my teenage boys need to know stability, blah, blah, blah)–I KNOW that I am getting screwed out of something truly GREAT!

    I have courage and have so much potential, and I find ways to prove it to myself. I try to do something truly terrifying, at least once a month. Last week, I actually entered a cage fight, because I’ve always wondered what it’d feel like being inside the ring. I got my butt kicked, and it was AWESOME. What was even more awesome was the fact that I returned to my crappy job, at the front desk, with an extremely black eye. No one had the courage to ask what happened. I would’ve gladly told them.

    I have no courage when it comes to losing my boys or possibly their respect. But, seriously, how can I expect them to respect their mother, if I continue to betray myself?

    This post really made me think that it’s time to just walk out of my job, my 15 year marriage, my current life. Ignore the emotion, embrace the fear, and just swim into that grey. Swim toward something better, swim toward myself.

    I don’t fear living in a box. But if I wait another 15 years living a life that’s not my own, I may not have a soul left. I do fear that.

    Thanks for your post and I love this blog!

  58. Fiona Says:

    Brilliant article and great comments. I spent 4 years in the financial sector, square peg in a round hole, suppressing my personality, my beliefs,my values, my moral code until my contract wasn’t renewed due to my “loudness”. Best thing that ever happened to me.

    Its only when you’re out of these hellholes you realise how damaging doing a job you hate is.

    Save money if you can, so you can survive for a bit. Everyone has the fear about what next. society/family and friends feed this. Ignore it and them, difficult but that fear will keep you shackled to your desk.

  59. Brittany Says:

    This is REAL. You’ve perfectly captured the silent motionless cubicle hysteria. I was that guy, I quit, it was awesome, and I am totally different/better human being for it. A+

  60. Shahd Says:

    “begin your new life”

    …as a homeless beggar

    • Jason Durden Says:

      “…as a homeless beggar”

      Only if you’re lazy and have no motivation whatsoever. If that’s the case, you’d better just keep plodding along in sould-crushing drudgery for the sake of a paycheck. At least until you can’t stand it anymore, then maybe your view will change on the subject.

    • Jason Durden Says:

      “…as a homeless beggar”

      Only if you’re lazy and have no motivation whatsoever. If that’s the case, you’d better just keep plodding along in soul-crushing drudgery for the sake of a paycheck. At least until you can’t stand it anymore, then maybe your view will change on the subject.

  61. Jason Durden Says:

    “…as a homeless beggar”

    This is pure fear talk. Quitting your job will only lead to being homeless if you’re lazy and/or have no motivation whatsoever. If that’s the case you’d better just stick with the life of soul-crushing drudgery for the sake of a paycheck. At least until you can’t stand it anymore. At that point maybe you’ll change your view on the subject.

  62. Michelle Says:

    Such a fantastic, hilarious, poignant post! I was in one of those “golden handcuffs” type jobs, working all the damn time, constantly doing interviews, unhappy as HELL, and realizing that the people I was hiring were also going to be unhappy. When I couldn’t do it anymore, I wrote the most scathing letter I’ve ever committed to email and got…promoted. (I still quit.)

    What you said in a response earlier Julien about this being a generation thing is so true. Employers have so much more power than they did for the generations that are now doing most of the employing. The promise of entry-level positions actually gaining you some kind of entrance (and, heck, even legitimately qualifying as “entry-level!”) are gone. When I started my own thing, I thought – “why didn’t I do this sooner!?” but I wonder if I ever would have without the 10:10am’s popped blood vessel. :)

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